Academic plagiarism killing creativity of gennext

2014-04-05

Himalayan News Service

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We had our science project competitions for which collected materials and develop models with what limited resources we had. 

The school library was our major source. Our science teacher always inspired us to take things in layman’s terms. 

He referred science to our daily life which helped us to carry on various activities,” recalls Dibyesh Giri, 30, CEO of Smart-Tech Solutions.

The advancements of technology are a great boon to mankind. On the other hand, it is a curse that hinders the creativity of individuals. 

Nowadays, many young people, knowingly or unknowingly, are involved in plagiarism in their academics. Plagiarism refers to copying or imitating from the original thoughts, words and written work of another individual.



To get things done in an easy way, they simply copy from Internet or from friends to complete their projects and assignments. Such kind of activities may help them get their work done at that particular moment but in the long run such people will not have the originality or capacity in them for dealing with issues requiring further analytical write-ups at academic as well as official tasks.

Ghanshyam Neupane, an A-Level graduate who has been giving tuitions to his juniors, informs, “I’ve seen many of my fellow friends and my juniors making their friends do their assignments and even a whole group of friends copying each other’s homework.”

They put on their confidence pants and submit their assignments as their own work. It’s not easy to cheat the teachers, however; they might feel great about it without realizing that they themselves are being cheated in this process.

“Some students are hopeless, even if they refer to the Internet, they should at least make an attempt to rephrase it so that they go through the matter and gain some knowledge out of it. But they simply copy paste their essays. It’s funny yet very sad to see the link of the websites from which they print their assignments,” regrets Ashta Subba, General Paper teacher for A-Level at Chelsea International Academy.

Plagiarism is also not fair towards those hardworking students who spend time in research and come up with their own perceptions. 

Prathi Singh, an A-level graduate, says, “We had a classmate who used to copy her homework from different websites and compile them. We were aware of her level of writing skills, so we figured out that it was copied. But our teacher didn’t acknowledge the reality and praised her in class, often reading out her writings. We felt bad because we put in lots of effort in our assignments. However, the same teacher was shocked to see her poor essays in exam papers that displayed her original writing skills.”

The issue surrounding “thesis writing” is a different ballgame of a more serious nature in which higher academic qualifications are rather purchased. 

It is alarming to see A-4 size posters pasted on the lampposts of Ratna Park area that advertises “Get Masters Level thesis in two weeks only” with accompanying contact numbers and the company’s name. 

When Republica dialed the number of such an advertisement, a female who refused to give her name and the company’s name confidently, dealt with us. 

When asked about who writes the thesis, what subjects are available, the price and the word limit of the work that they provide, she answered, “We don’t have the entire subjects thesis since our “Sirs” are on leave for now. For a sociology thesis of 7000 to 8000 words, we charge Rs. 7,500 and for the proposal, we additionally charge Rs. 1,500. The proposal and thesis will be completed within a month.”

Although many students make a wise use of technology in order to widen their knowledge and put their own analysis, many are just exploiting it to get the easy way out. They have been deceiving only themselves and risking their own future.

(Source: Republica National Daily)